Browsing Tag

white tea

Tea Guides

A Beginners Guide: The Six Types of Teas

March 23, 2022

All teas come from the same plant called Camillea Sinensis. What makes these teas different from one another is the processing of the tea leaves. There are six mains types of teas: Black Tea, White Tea, Green Tea, Oolong, Dark and Yellow Tea. You may be reading this thinking, “Well what about Rooibos and Chamomile? These are actually considered Tisanes. Lets jump into all six of these teas and their qualities!

White Tea

White tea is known to be one of the most delicate tea varieties because it is so minimally processed. White tea is harvested before the tea plant’s leaves open fully, when the young buds are still covered by fine white hairs, hence the name “white” tea. White tea is typically only harvested in spring.

White tea has a very light, refreshing taste to it. You can expect sweet honey notes and lightly vegetal flavors, from a delicate Silver Needle to a more full-bodied White Peony.

White tea has many benefits to it as well! Thanks to minimal processing, white tea has the most antioxidants of all. These help protect the body from free radicals, fight disease and keep you and your immune system healthy. White teas have also been shown to help reverse skin damage caused by stress, diet and sun, and can even help the skin to rebuild resistance to stress.

Black Tea

Black tea is one of the most popular tea selections out there. It has a bold flavor and long shelf life. There are many types of black tea ranging from Earl Grey to English breakfast. Black tea leaves are allowed to fully oxidize before being processed and dried, which makes the leaves dark brown and gives the tea its signature flavor profile. Black teas tend to be bold and brisk, and they are often described as astringent.

After the leaves are picked, they are gently bruised and allowed to fully oxidise. During this process the leaves will turn from the green you see on the bush to the brown we recognize as tea, before finally being dried.

Black tea is loaded with health benefits. Thanks to their high caffeine content, black teas will give you that kick to get you out of bed in the morning. Unlike coffee, the caffeine in black tea is slow-release and therefore leaves you feeling energised for longer. Black tea is also naturally high in flavonoids, powerful antioxidants known to help lower cholesterol, thereby reducing the risk of strokes and heart attacks.

Green Tea

Green tea is another extremely popular tea among tea drinkers. The taste of green tea varies. Green teas can range from the sweet, floral character of a Chinese green, such as Jade Tips, to an intense vegetal Japanese Sencha, the flavor depending on where the leaves are grown and how the leaves are heated. Green tea is widely believed to be bitter in taste. However, this is usually due to burning the leaves with boiling water. When brewed at lower temperatures the resulting flavor should be smooth, clean and even sweet. The leaves are plucked, slightly withered, then immediately cooked to preserve the green quality and prevent oxidization. As a result of these methods, green teas have a much higher concentration of chlorophyll, polyphenols, and antioxidants than other tea types. 

Green tea has been shown to have positive effects on parts of the brain used for memory, increasing cognitive functions. Green tea is also a favorite for many nutritionists thanks to its effect on the metabolism. Matcha, in particular, is often included in smoothies, energy balls and pre-workout snacks.

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea is often overlooked despite having some of the most varied and exciting flavor profiles. From lighter ‘green’ oolongs to the darker, more heavily oxidised oolongs, it is this varying level of oxidation that makes this tea type so exciting, offering a huge spectrum of flavour. Expect everything from a light and floral to a dark and aromatic.

After the leaves are picked (usually whole shoots), they are gently withered to remove some of the moisture from the leaf, before being tumbled in a bamboo drum. This process bruises the leaves and provokes oxidation. Oolongs are semi-oxidised which means that unlike black teas which are allowed to oxidise fully, for oolongs the process is halted after a certain time. The period of oxidation varies depending on the type of oolong being produced and can vary from 10% oxidation for a ‘green’ oolong, to over 60% for a darker Oolong. The leaves are then pan fired at high temperatures before being rolled and dried.

Oolong has been shown to help so many areas of your skin! From anti-aging to eczema to a healthy radiant glow, oolong is the way to go!

Dark Tea

Many people assume dark teas and black teas are the same. They are not! Dark teas are actually closer to green teas in they way that they are processed in the beginning. They then go through a fermentation process. The most common dark tea is Pu’er tea. It is one of the oldest types of tea, with a history dating back more than 2,000 years. Pu-erh teas are often described as having a subtle mushroom-like taste. This ancient tea originates in Yunnan province on China’s southwestern frontier, where a temperate climate and lush landscapes, teeming with biodiversity, provide ideal growing conditions for tea. 

In China, pu-erh tea has long been sipped to achieve a variety of health benefits, such as improvements in heart health and reductions in cholesterol levels. It’s also said that pu-erh tea can help promote weight loss, enhance eyesight, stimulate circulation, and soothe hangovers.

Yellow Tea

Yellow tea is produced similarly to white tea and green tea though an additional step is added. This extra step produces a tea that brews into a golden hue and features a mellow flavor without grassy notes. Yellow tea is a Chinese tea that is difficult to find outside of China. That’s because the process to produce this tea is time intensity, requires additional labor, and proves to be difficult when it comes to large-scale quality control. As a result, there are only three main types of yellow tea available on the market today!

Yellow tea undergoes a production process that is similar to green tea but includes one extra, time-consuming step. The leaves are harvested in early spring and immediately dried using direct sunlight or gentle pan-firing. Once dry, the leaves are wrapped in wet paper or cloth to induce a mild oxidation process through steaming. The yellow tea leaves are oxidized for up to three days and may undergo additional firing or drying rounds. This tea processing method produces a yellowing effect on the tea leaves.

Yellow tea is packed with antioxidants including polyphenols and catechins that are beneficial to overall health. These antioxidants work to prevent damage known as oxidative stress, which is caused by the presence of free radicals. This type of stress is known to breakdown healthy cellular processes and can contribute to premature aging as well as mental decline. The tea is naturally calorie-free, making it a good choice for people on weight loss plans that are looking to replace sugary sodas with healthier alternatives.

Tea Guides

Top 5 Springtime Teas To Enjoy

March 8, 2022

Tea is delicious any time of year and can be made in any way to give you an ideal beverage of choice for whatever weather or occasion you find yourself in. Spring is an especially great season to enjoy tea in, as it brings with it a beautiful bloom of fresh, lush greenery that seems to stretch as far as your eye can see. You’ll also see an entire season of nourishing rains and growth, celebrating the end of winter and looking forward to a new beginning. Teas can capture this taste and natural beauty easily, giving you a delicious drink to sip on and experiment with. In this blog post, we’re discussing the top five springtime teas that you can enjoy — all year long! 

Benefits of enjoying spring teas 

You may think that a tea’s benefits are the same at any time of year. While that is partly true, you can gain extra health benefits simply by enjoying your favorite brew during this special season. Experts have found that winter can significantly slow your circulation, leaving you feeling restless and sluggish. This is made worse by the early darkening hours and other seasonal elements and weather shifts. 

Making tea drinking a regular habit in the spring can help to rejuvenate your system and get your blood pumping quickly, also bringing with it the added benefit of additional energy and an immune boost ahead of spring flu season. You can also enjoy the added benefits of seasonal allergy repression, as certain teas such as Butterbur have been found to be just as effective as prescription allergy medications. 

Springtime teas to enjoy this season

There really isn’t a wrong time for tea, but there are certain flavors and styles that can particularly pop during certain times of the year. Maybe the shift in the season has you feeling adventurous, and want to branch out into new flavors — such as a fresh and tart blueberry, lemon, mint, and black tea blend, or a springtime cherry rose sencha. In either case, we have you covered! Read on to learn about five teas that you can indulge in this springtime season.  

1. Blueberry White Blend

Nothing says spring like the honey-sweet, light, and floral taste of a quality white tea blend! Pair this with your favorite fruit addition, and you have a bouquet of flavors that will fall over your tongue with all of the nostalgia and fresh starts that spring can bring. If you’re looking for a new tea to enjoy in your morning rotation, this blueberry white tea blend makes a great choice. White tea is an oral protective tea, and can also have anti-cancer and antibacterial properties thanks to its extensive antioxidant profile. It also is known for giving you a slight morning pep without sending you into a caffeine buzz, as it only has 15-30 milligrams of caffeine. This is one of the lightest caffeinated teas you can drink, as other types of tea can have double this amount per cup. Blueberry additions add to this lovely mix, making it the perfect base for any drink. Add in your favorite dried petals or fruit bits from loose-leaf blends to make this a fruity infusion of your own! 

2. Chamomile Tea 

We know chamomile herbal tea is a classic, but it’s a classic for a reason! This tea shouldn’t be overlooked in your springtime tea collection, as it can provide soothing benefits and reduce the pain of seasonal sore throats. If you’re dealing with allergies, it’s known as a natural antihistamine. This can gradually help build your immunity to seasonal allergies over time if taken on a consistent basis. If you’ve never tried it, you should — its light and airy flavor blended with notes of fresh, herbaceous taste can make for the perfect daytime drink. 

3. Good Morning Oolong Blend

Start your morning right with this bright, full-bodied Good Morning Oolong blend! This tea is like sunshine on your palate and offers you the morning zest and zing that you’re looking for to help get you motivated for your day. Oolong tea comes with its own health benefits and is a great choice if you’re looking to lose weight. It’s also known to help reinforce heart and bone health. 

4. Dragonfruit White 

Dragonfruit white tea is a great blend to sit and sip by your favorite sunny spring nook. The refreshing and exotic tastes of the fruit pair beautifully with the light and sunshine-like experience that the white tea adds to any blend. Dragonfruit is known for its cloyingly sweet undertones and fresh, tart aftertaste. You can experience the best parts of the flavor profile with each sip, as the heat extracts the most benefit and oils from the leaves. This tea is delicious either hot or iced. 

5. Lemon Ginger Herbal Tea 

We just had to include this zingy, flavorful lemon ginger herbal tea blend on the list! The ultimate cure for stomachaches, bloat, and fatigue, this tea will help refresh you and get you ready to take on your day. Lemon is packed with antioxidants and can offer significant protection against heart and liver disease. Ginger is ideal to settle your stomach and adds a refreshing taste to this blend! Enjoy this hot or iced, and savor the herbaceous and fresh flavors of the season with lemon-ginger herbal tea! 

We hope you enjoyed this list of the top teas to sip on this spring. What would you add to the list? 

Tea Recipes

Tea Pairing 101: What Tea Should I Pair with my Meal

February 17, 2022

You may have heard of the traditional tea time foods like sandwiches, scones and cakes to pair with tea but what about every other meal? Just like certain wines pair perfectly with certain foods, tea is exactly the same. With their different flavor profiles, this makes for some delicious pairings that will enhance your culinary experience. Pairing tea with food is the perfect way to enhance the taste of a dish as well as the drink itself. For centuries, sommeliers and chefs have paired certain wines with certain foods. Most of us are familiar with the basic rules: Red wines to accompany rich, red meat dishes. White wines to accompany white meats, fish and vegetarian dishes. Dessert wines for… well, dessert!

There are a number of different types of tea including white, green, oolong pu’erh and black. Generally white tea has the most delicate and subtle flavors, black and dark teas having the deepest flavors and black tea the highest tannin content/astringency. When you have a dish in mind that you want to match a tea with, consider the weight of the dish and what type of tea has a similar intensity.

White Teas

Because of the extremely subtle flavor of white teas, we recommend pairing them with only the mildest of flavors so you do not miss the sweetness that is so loved in white tea. Pure white tea has a very delicate flavor, sometimes with notes of apricot and has a buttery mouthfeel. It is often seen in blends with fruits like peaches or flowers like roses or orange blossoms. Think of white tea as you would a delicate white fish. Its taste easily melds with whatever flavors it’s paired with. 

Pairing suggestions: oatmeal, yogurt, or other light dishes with fresh berries for breakfast and basmati rice, white fish and basic salads with lunch and dinner.

Our favorite white teas: White Peony, Dragonfruit and Citrus Blossom.

Green Teas

Green tea is known for its subtle taste and light and refreshing flavor profile in comparison to other types of tea like many varieties of black tea.  In general, the subtle, vegetative flavor and aroma of most green tea is well suited to mild or subtly flavored foods, such as seafood, rice, salads, melon or chicken. Green tea is also great to drink after meals as it has been shown to help aid in digestion!

Pairing suggestions: Fish, lemon, mint, basil, vinegar, smoked or barbecued meat.

Our favorite green teas: Gunpowder Green, Sencha, Moroccan Mint

Oolong

Many argue that the subtle complexity of flavor and aroma attributed to oolong tea demand drinking it on its own. However, because oolongs can range in character between green and black teas, many can be paired with food along the same lines as their green or black counterparts. For instance, greener oolongs tend to go well with scallops, lobster and other sweet rich foods, while darker oolongs compliment somewhat stronger-flavored foods such as duck and grilled meats.

Pairing suggestions: Bread and butter, fruit, roasted vegetables, milk chocolate, lightly salted foods.

Our favorite oolongs: Morning Oolong and Formosa.

Black Teas

The more robust flavors and aromas of most black teas, as well as the most pronounced tannins, are well suited to pairing with full-flavored foods such as meat and spicy dishes. Unlike green teas, black tea leaves have been cured and are therefore fully oxidized, resulting in a somewhat more astringent taste, together with malty and woody, roasted flavors similar to bread.

Pairing suggestions: Spicy food, beef, lamb, ham and chicken, lightly salted food, pasta dishes (like lasagna), and fruits.

Our favorite black teas: Darjeeling, Ceylon and Lapsang Souchong.

Pu’erh Tea

Worthy of special note, pu-erh teas are known for their digestive benefits. Pu-erh teas have a strong, earthy and distinctive flavor, and they make great choices alongside a chicken or stir-fry recipe, as they can neutralize the oily and greasy tastes. Thanks to their digestive benefits, these beverages are often preferred after large meals.

Pairing suggestions: After meal, eggs, red meat, wild mushrooms, chocolate, poultry.

Desserts and Tea

For desserts, we suggest seeking out English Breakfast black tea. Our Chinese teas are hearty, rich, and taste perfect when complementing baked custards, chocolate cakes, or a rich, dense strawberry shortcake. Assam is another rich black tea that complements chocolate desserts, yet is a surprising foil against lemony or custard dishes. Some may be sensitive to caffeine. To that we suggest our Decaf Earl Grey or Decaf English Breakfast. Due to the naturally sweet, floral nature of a Jasmine, it is also ideal to serve with a dessert such as fruit, macaroons and any coconut desserts! Chai tea also pairs wonderfully with light pastries and scones.

Tea Guides

The Tea Infused Skincare You Never Knew You Needed

January 10, 2022

We drink it. We use it in recipes. And now we’re adding it to our skincare routine. Tea is not only great to sip on, but has so many incredible benefits for our skin, too! It’s no wonder that all the benefits from drinking tea can also apply to putting in onto your skin. From earl grey tea to green tea to matcha and everything in between, tea is the it ingredient skin care right now.

Innisfree Green Tea Hydrating Sleeping Mask

Innisfree is a company that puts in the work to make sure that all of their products are clean and organic. That includes their Green Tea Sleep Mask. This mask is a hydration-boosting overnight mask infused with green tea that quenches skin and provides antioxidant protection while you snooze. Just remember that when using sleep masks to apply after your moisturizer.

Fresh Black Tea Firming Overnight Mask

We’re hitting you with another sleep mask (because frankly, they are powerhouses in your skincare routine). Fresh Black Tea Firming Overnight Mask is an intensely moisturizing treatment that lifts your nighttime ritual to new heights. This sleeping mask acts like a corset for your complexion, giving you a lifted, firmer look by morning. This mask is made with a mix of kombucha (black tea ferment), black tea extract, blackberry leaf extract, and lychee seed extract which is proven to inhibit damaging free radicals and helps improve the appearance of skin elasticity. 

Herbivore Jasmine Green Tea Oil Control Toner

Possibly the most well known of clean beauty brands is Herbivore Botanicals. It can be found everywhere from big retailers like Urban Outfitters to small curated shops like Follain– and for good reason. All of their products are made from food-grade ingredients because after all, you shouldn’t put something on your skin that you wouldn’t put in your body, right? Their Jasmine Green Tea Toner has the powers of antioxidant-rich green tea infused into luxurious jasmine flower water. It’s formulated to reduce oiliness, fight blemishes, and treat combination, oily, and blemish-prone complexions.

Winky Lux Matcha Sugared Lip Scrub

When it comes to skincare, we often forget about giving love to our lips! Lip care is especially important in the dry, cold winter months of the year. This Matcha Sugared Lip Scrub by Winky Lux will smooth and soften to help even the most chapped of lips. Blended with sugar, green tea extract and natural vanilla to gently exfoliate, moisturize, and recharge lips. Your lips will love you so matcha!

CREMORLAB Herb Tea Pure Calming Mask

Everyone knows that Korean beauty products are top notch and this herb tea calming sheet mask does not disappoint. Infused with aloe vera, rosewater and thermal water, this mask contains black tea and chamomile extracts. The tannins and polyphenols inside the black tea extract purify and soothe your skin whilst hydrating the dermis. There is a reason this brand has a cult following!

COOLA Classic Sport Face Sunscreen with White Tea

If there is one thing that you take away from this blogpost, please let it be that you NEED to be wearing sunscreen everyday (yes, even when you are indoors!) They state that this is a “Farm to Face” organic sunscreen with white tea that features fortified sun protection that’s unbelievably light, non-greasy, and sheer on any skin tone. This sunscreen is designed for those long, active days in the sun but light enough for everyday use. Board certified Dr. Bindu Sthalekar says, “White tea contains high amounts of anti-bacterial and anti-aging properties that help prevent wrinkles and sagging skin”. Sounds like a win win all around!

Whamisa by Glow Studio Chai Tea Eye Cream

Who knew that your daily glass of chai latte can give some extra skincare benefits? Known to increase blood circulation, chai combats puffiness and dark circles. Blended with flavanoid-rich rooibos, this chai tea eye cream by Whamisa will fill in wrinkles and curb fine lines. Formulated without any parabens, mineral oils and fragrances, you will get the best pick-me-up that you never knew you needed.

Tea has been around for thousands and thousands of years and it is no surprise that we are now adding it to our skincare routine. From hydration to clearing blemishes, tea does it all. Weather consuming orally or topically, it is sure to keep your skin glowing.

If you try out any of these products, let us know! Be sure to follow us on Instagram @theteakitchen for daily posts on all things related to tea!

Tea Guides

How Much Caffeine Are You Drinking in Your Tea?

March 28, 2016

Although we can estimate how much caffeine will be in your cup of tea, determining this amount never comes down to an exact science. Many factors play into how much of a kick you can get from your daily brew. Caffeine occurs naturally in tea, but the content varies based on growing variances, manufacturing, steeping times and brewing conditions. So whether you’re looking to give yourself a boost for that late night study session or sip on a soothing blend before bed, check out our definitive ranking of tea based on caffeine level to know just how much you’re drinking:

Herbal Tea (0mg)

If you want to relax with a toasty cup before bed, then herbal tea is definitely the way to go. Herbal teas are a great way to enjoy the benefits from tea’s antioxidants while avoiding the jittery feelings that often accompany caffeine intake. Herbal varieties are typically all-natural, made from various plant materials including the leaves, stems, roots and flowers from plants other than the Camellia Sinensis. Another benefit? Herbal teas don’t pose the risk of having addictive qualities, as is typically common with caffeinated beverages. However, if you’re still craving a little caffeine throughout the day, try substituting one cup a day with an herbal blend.

Decaf Tea (2-6mg)

Now you’re probably wondering,”how and why is there any caffeine in decaffeinated tea anyways?” Well, it’s important to note that decaffeinated does not mean the same thing as caffeine-free. Decaffeinated tea typically refers to black or green tea that has had most of its natural caffeine removed through processes that involve either the soaking or filtration of the leaves. But rest assured, the amount is almost negligible – by law, decaf tea must have less than 2.5% of its original caffeine level. So go ahead and brew another cup, it won’t keep you up at night.

White Tea (10-15mg)

White teas are the least processed of all teas, releasing minimal amounts of caffeine from their leaves while giving off a very subtle and silky taste. Though typically lower in caffeine content than its more processed counterparts, there can still be a wide range. However, white teas are usually blended with different herbs which bring down the caffeine level. White tea is a good option at anytime of the day, boasting little to no negative side effects.

Green Tea (20-35mg)

Green tea works as a great midday pick-me-up. Its moderately low caffeine level produces a very steady effect when consumed, causing no peaks or plunges. It is also considered an effective meditative aid, acting as a mild stimulant without causing any insomnia or jitters. The benefits of green tea are also numerous, so if you want to drink two or three servings a day, I’m not stopping you…

Oolong Tea (30-50mg)

Oolong tea is halfway between green and black teas, both in caffeine and oxidation levels. It has the body and complexity of a black tea while still maintaining the brightness of a green tea, making it a favorite among tea connoisseurs. Its caffeine content is both healthy and palatable, so it can provide a nice boost without the risk of crashing later in the day.

Black Tea (40-60mg)

Black tea is the strongest and most caffeinated of all the tea varieties. It acts as the perfect way to awaken your senses and kickstart your day. Chai tea is on the lower end of the caffeine spectrum while more processed blends can release higher levels. If you’re worried about too much caffeine, don’t stress; black tea still pales in comparison to the ridiculous caffeine content in coffee (just another reason why tea will always prevail).

Tea Recipes

How to Pair Tea with Food

January 6, 2016

Those who enter in the world of pairings are entering a new dimension of taste.

Knowing which foods pair well with particular teas is a fine art. Food pairing is often portrayed as a staple of the high class and the cultured living. Although the world of wine pairing may be the more popular, the world of tea and food pairings has plenty to offer.

Pairing can bring out particular flavors out of both the food and the tea. It’s as much a hobby as it is a treat. Here are a few combinations to introduce you to the world of tea and food pairings.

Meats

Meat is a particularly diverse category for tea pairing. Much of the decision comes down to not what type of meat you pair it with, such as pork or chicken or fish. Rather, it is much more important to consider how the meat is seasoned and what method is used to cook it.

For example a lemon-herb chicken may pair great with darjeeling or oolong tea, while a fried chicken would pair better with assam or nilgiri for its briskness and mildly malty taste.

For grilled meats dragonwell tea would be ideal due to its toasty aroma. When looking for teas to pair with meats you’re looking for a tea with more intensity and flavor to compliment the meats.

Fruits and Veggies

Fruits and veggies require a much lighter tea than their meat counterparts. While heavier teas such as gunpowder and dragonwell tend to go great with a large diversity of meats, a softer and lighter tea would benefit the fruits and veggies best.

Remember, you’re looking for a tea that’s fragrant and potentially floral, and refreshing. I find that white teas work best for those criteria. Peaches and apricots are a popular fruit to pair with white tea. I would also recommend making a cucumber salad, pairing it with your favorite white tea, and adding a few tiny drops of honey for the smallest bit of sweetness.

If you’re looking for something a bit stronger than white I’d highly recommend oolong tea, especially for apricots.

Deserts

There is tremendous diversity in the desert world. Darjeeling tea tends to go great a variety of cream deserts, from cheesecake to crème brûlée (that’s always my first choice). With chocolate cake, you ought to select a heavier tea.

For a basic chocolate cake a smoky black tea would be phenomenal. A simple earl grey would pair great here. However it would be best not to pair a black tea with an especially sweet chocolate. In that situation I would reach for a light oolong tea to not overpower the sweetness and to bring out the flavors in both the oolong and the chocolate.

Something with a strong vanilla flavor would pair great with Ceylon, which brings out the full-bodied flavor of the crylon.

Herbs and spices

If you feel like getting creative with your pairings use these as a quick guide to flavors: Assam and yunnan go great with chilis, while sencha and gunpowder pair fantastically with garlic.

The refreshing flavor of mint is really brought out by darjeeling and yuny ting oolong. Cinnamon, a staple of teas thanks of its warm aroma is complimented by yunnan, assam, and autumnal darjeeling.

Cheese

Although cheese and wine pairings are absolute staples of upper-class eating, there are plenty of tea and cheese pairings that are worth exploring.

The smoothness and creaminess would blend superbly with various teas. Kathy Yl Chan at Eater.com recommends the following pairings: white tea + ricotta, green tea + Flory’s Truckle cheddar, oolong + Ewephoria sheep milk gouda and Fromager d’Affinois, black tea + chiriboga blue, matcha + tomme crayeuse.

All of these sound like great opportunities to refine your pallet and experience new taste combinations.

Alcohol

This one may seem strange at first. What do you do, pour the booze in with the tea? Should you have a shot of alcohol at the ready or a glass on the side? Either, really.

And actually, I’m a fan of pouring the booze in with the tea, so long as you make sure to not overpower the tea.

However the more refined and experienced drinkers might use the sipping method. A smoky drink like brandy would pair fantastically with a smoky tea. An English breakfast tea would work extremely well here.

For the more daring tea lovers, it’s said that an ideal tea-alcohol pairing is lapsang enjoyed with either a port or a chardonnay brings out the best of both drinks.

Umami

This is a personal favorite of mine. For those unfamiliar, umami is said to be the fifth flavor, the other four being sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness. It is most often found is in the controversial additive MSG, which has an unfair but understandable reputation of being unhealthy or potentially harmful.

Regardless of its controversy, it is delicious. And anyone who attempts to pair tea with umami is in for a treat.

I tend to go for the traditional approach, pairing sushi with a classic green tea, but you can go with anything from California rolls to my absolute favorite: the crunchy roll! The green tea and the umami in the sushi will combine into a particularly savory taste. It’s an absolute treat.

So if you have a salty, sweet or salty-sweet palate any of these tea and food pairings will do the trick. They’re especially fun to try at a house warming party, birthday or an quiet evening at home!

Feel free to mix and match and let us know what pairings worked best for you!