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Tea Health Benefits

Effects of Caffeine on The Human Body 

May 24, 2022

Caffeine is what so many of us use to get through our day…but do you really know what it’s doing to your body? Studies have shown that caffeine is neutral, or even beneficial in small doses. However, drinking it in excess can lead to serious health complications. Below, we’re covering the effects of caffeine on the human body by each system, and calling awareness to foods that have hidden caffeine — and that should be consumed in moderation. 

What is caffeine? 

Caffeine can be found either naturally, such as in tea, or artificially — such as in energy drinks or other beverages like soft drinks. In the body, it directly affects the brain’s uptake of a compound called adenosine. Adenosine works actively to make us feel drowsy, and will be secreted naturally at the end of the day, and rises in concentrations until we eventually fall asleep. By blocking the receptors that accept adenosine, caffeine is very effective at keeping you awake. 

What are the effects of caffeine on the human body? 

Beyond what we have discussed, there are many other effects that caffeine has on the human body. We’ve explained them systematically below: 

The cardiovascular system

Caffeine’s effects on heart rates are well known. In excess, you can experience palpitations, hypertension, and other complications from caffeine, either natural or artificial. The reason why caffeine has a direct effect on your heart is due to its ability to stimulate the “fight or flight” compounds in the body: noradrenaline and norepinephrine. This can be dangerous if you build up a tolerance over time, and begin boosting your intake to feel the same effects that you once did. 

The digestive system 

Caffeine is known to stimulate your digestive system and can aid in motility-related problems. The result of this is that food and beverages will move much quicker through the digestive tract, and can result in loose stool passing quickly through your colon. This only happens in some people, as others may not be as sensitive to its effects, or may have built up a tolerance over time. 

The neurological system 

What many may not know about caffeine is its direct effects on the neurological system. Overall, caffeine intake can reduce blood flow to the brain, but boost the amount of energy that it expends. It also triggers the release of dopamine in the brain. This stimulates the reward centers and pleasure centers, making you feel satisfied. It’s no wonder that so many people are dependent on their first cup of morning coffee! 

The skeletal system 

Caffeine consumption can block the absorption of calcium in your bones, which can put you at risk for conditions such as osteoporosis, or recurring fracture. It also actively lowers your bone mineral density, which makes your bones more porous over time. There are also ongoing studies that point to the potential correlation of caffeine consumption and obesity rates, as it may inhibit the body’s natural weight regulation processes. 

Is caffeine bad for you? 

Caffeine isn’t inherently bad for you, especially when consumed in moderation. The risk of caffeine comes with overconsumption, as with anything else. In fact, caffeine actually has some benefits that you can enjoy with your daily cup, including: 

  • Memory: You can get a hearty memory boost when you enjoy caffeine, and also get a powerful jolt of energy. That’s why so many people enjoy a morning cup of coffee or tea, as it can help you to feel energized, alert, and ready to take on your day. 
  • Preventative wellness: Enjoying caffeine regularly through tea or coffee is linked to lower rates of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Research continues to be ongoing to discover additional effects. 

If you’re looking to cut down your consumption of caffeine, you’re likely wondering how much caffeine your daily cup of tea has. Caffeination levels in tea aren’t generally calculated with exacting formulas and science. They are estimated and rounded to get you the most accurate level possible. It also depends entirely on your blend of tea. If you’re drinking a cup of loose leaf black tea, you’re likely averaging 47mg of caffeine per cup.

What foods have naturally occurring caffeine in them? 

There are a variety of food and beverages that have naturally occurring caffeine in them, including: 

  • Chocolate 
  • Black tea
  • White tea
  • Green tea
  • Guarana 
  • Coffee

If you’re looking to avoid caffeine, you can opt for caffeine-free versions of these foods, or avoid them entirely. There are plenty of loose leaf herbal tea options online and or decaf teas you can find too. Ultimately, it’s finding what works for you in your journey of a full caffeine or free of caffeine lifestyle, but likely you’re somewhere in the middle!

Tea Guides

Teas to Boost Your Focus Naturally 

May 16, 2022

Are you looking for an extra boost of focus and adrenaline ahead of your busy day? Using tea to help you reach new heights in productivity and focus is a strategy used for years. The teas in this list offer unique, plant-powered, and natural ways to give you heightened awareness and focus without coffee’s buzz and crash. Below, we’ve listed the top focus boosting teas to help you get through your next “busy period” — finals, a work project, or your next Monday morning. 

What teas are best for productivity? 

Don’t reach for the coffee if you’re looking for a drink with a bit of kick to get you through your day. Read on to learn which teas you should drink to hack your mindset and boost your productivity: 

Jasmine tea 

Jasmine tea is known for its fruity-floral taste and light, crisp mouthfeel. Experts believe that you may be able to enjoy higher levels of brain function and health with every cup, leaving you feeling refreshed, focused, and ready to take on your day. Besides promoting emotional resilience, jasmine blends can also have 15-60 milligrams of caffeine per cup, depending on the brew cycle. You don’t have to worry about a crash, though, as jasmine also has high levels of L-Theanine. This is a chemical that soothes the brain and can put you in a more calm and focused state. 

This tea isn’t just a great tea to enjoy hot or iced. Instead, try spicing up your next meat rub by adding dried jasmine leaves and petals for a more herbaceous, sweet, and clean finish. You can view other uncommon tea-based rubs here for some dinner inspiration. 

Black tea 

Black tea has been well-known for its ability to wake you up, competing actively with coffee when it comes to the caffeine content and potential for productivity with each cup. Black tea can also give your body a powerful antioxidant boost, perfect for keeping you healthy throughout the cold and flu season. An additional perk of using black loose leaf tea is its consistent, clean, and earthy taste, offering you a reliable “blank palate” for you to personalize with your favorite infusions or sweeteners. You can also personalize the overall caffeine content in your brew using these strategies for a more tailored-to-you tea experience. 

Considering going back to coffee on those extra-busy days? We recommend against it.  Enjoying black tea instead of coffee also offers the added benefit of lowered cortisol levels and higher resiliency over time, helping to manage your physiological system well under stress. You can enjoy black tea brewed or infused into this amazing black tea oatmeal recipe if you’re in a rush. We know that you’ll love it as much as we do! 

Peppermint tea 

Peppermint tea is a great choice for you if you struggle with remaining alert and awake throughout your day. This type of tea has a minty-fresh taste that can also offer an added therapeutic benefit through its aroma and help frame your mind in a more work-ready way. The elements in peppermint tea stimulate and process in the areas of your brain that control productivity and alertness, making this the perfect tea to reach for on early mornings or late nights at work. 

This herbal tea doesn’t contain caffeine, which is ideal for tea drinkers who are sensitive to caffeine or simply want to avoid the buzz and crash. If you’re looking for a more mild tea experience, you may want to stir in a few spoons of honey or sweetener of choice. The delicious and fresh notes of peppermint tea mixed with the sweetness can give you an experience similar to dessert. 

Make tea a part of your productivity ritual 

Making tea a part of your productivity process and habit can help you to prepare your brain for periods of intensive, deep work and focus. It doesn’t just have to be a black tea to give you a productivity boost, it can other types of teas, giving you all the benefits you need to get a little extra energy and a little extra focus so you can get through any task.

We pride ourselves on sourcing the highest quality tea leaves and blends from all corners of the world — and creating unique and delicious blends to suit every unique palate. Browse loose leaf tea you can buy on our shop.

Tea Health Benefits

Energizing Teas to Help Start Your Morning Off On The Right Foot

July 19, 2021

There is nothing better than starting your morning off with a little bit of caffeine to kick off your day. While many look to coffee for their caffeine kick of the day, we recommend tea to give you that extra boost of energy in the morning. The caffeine found in tea differs from the caffeine found in coffee as it delivers longer energy boosts and fewer adverse side effects. Tea offers a more focused and sustained amount of energy levels without that dreadful caffeine crash often experienced with coffee. While coffee can cause jittery feelings, drinking tea can reduce your stress level while also making you feel more alert. 

Caffeine is one of the main sources of energy that is found in many teas. Not only does it boost your energy, but it also promotes focus and calmness. There are different amounts of caffeine found in different teas. The antioxidant properties and compounds found in tea allow for energy-boosting and other health benefits which is far more than coffee can say. This is primarily due to the presence of L-Theanine, a compound found in tea that promotes these side effects. L-Theanine is a unique amino acid that is commonly associated with brain function and its effects on the central nervous system. Similar to caffeine, different types of teas contain different amounts of l-theanine. L-Theanine works in conjunction with caffeine to provide improved brain function.

So, take the alternate route and get your caffeine intake from tea with these 4 energizing teas to help kick off your morning.

Green Tea (nutritional benefits + caffeine)

Although Green Tea contains less caffeine than coffee, it still has enough to provide a more stable energy supply. Recent studies have shown that consuming a glass of green tea every day can significantly boost your endurance and energy. Aside from green tea acts as an energy booster, it also can help lower blood pressure levels, repair damaged skin, and provide your body with other healthy nutrients to supplement a healthy lifestyle. Drinking green tea can result in mental alertness without the caffeine crash associated with other energy drinks. Green Tea also is known to contain small amounts of vitamin C which is another compound linked to energy boosting.

One type of Green Tea that is a big caffeine boost that is loaded with catechizes & polyphenols is Matcha. A single serving of Matcha can boost your alertness for an entire day, whereas coffee is typically absorbed in just 30 minutes. This is due to the high concentration of antioxidants and amino acids found in Matcha. L-theanine works with caffeine to absorb caffeine over time which equates to a prolonged effect of alertness. It also means that you do not face the harsh side effects commonly associated with caffeine. Our Green Tea Collection is full of teas that can provide you with all of the side effects listed above, try it today.

Black Tea (bold & comparable to coffee)

Black Tea is another tea drink that is high in caffeine, in fact, it may contain the highest amount of caffeine when compared to others. It is low-calorie and packed with antioxidants. Not only can Black Tea assist in promoting alertness, but it also can improve your gut health, reduce blood sugar levels, and lower your risk of heart disease. According to the FDA, certain blends of black tea may contain up to 90 milligrams of caffeine in a single 8-oz serving. This is due to the long fermentation process associated with the preparation of black tea leaves. Though 90 milligrams may be only half of the amount of caffeine found in coffee, it also means that there is less risk for caffeine crashes or jittery feelings. We recommend checking out our collection of Black Teas to experience the effects it has on your energy levels.

White tea (less aggressive)

White tea provides the most subtle effect of caffeine as it contains a high number of antioxidants but a lesser amount of caffeine. Some of the other impressive benefits associated with white tea include acting as an aid in weight loss, benefitting your dental health, and combatting skin aging. White tea provides you with an alternate approach to caffeine intake as it has a gentler effect. Because white tea leaves go through less processing, we do not see a higher level of caffeine present in it. Our White Peony Tea is a great way to get your subtle dose of caffeine.

If you are looking for a caffeine boost of energy but don’t want to experience the uncertainty of adverse effects found in coffee, try tea. Among the many other health benefits, tea takes a more practical approach to boost your energy and prolonging your alertness throughout the day. Tea is guaranteed to give you a subtle mental boost and can assist in improving your health in many other ways.

Tea Health Benefits

8 Ways Tea is Better Than Coffee

March 31, 2016

Okay tea lovers, spread the word. I know it’s true, you know it’s true. But it’s time to show the world why tea should always be everyone’s beverage of choice. While coffee might have a cult following in many parts of the country (if not world), tea ultimately comes out on top in countless ways. From its proven health benefits to its hypnotizing aroma, it’s time to prove to those coffee hounds why tea beats coffee once and for all.

It’s hydrating.

Think about it: tea is just pure water with added flavor from all-natural herbs and plants. Sipping on some tea (hot or cold) will replenish your body’s fluids, leading to additional benefits like smoother skin and weight loss. And whereas you should limit your consumption of coffee to one or two cups a day, experts say you can drink up to FIVE cups of tea a day before you should think of cutting yourself off.

It won’t make you crash.

Although tea typically has less caffeine than coffee (which can be seen as a benefit in and of itself), it can actually help you sustain your energy longer because it won’t lead to any peaks or crashes. While both drinks will give you the boost you need to get your day started, coffee has a much larger effect as a depressant, meaning the high will last shorter and drop quicker. So if you want to sustain your energy throughout the day, tea is definitely the way to go.

It has tons of antioxidants.

All teas contain an abundance of natural antioxidants (way more than coffee), leaving you feeling and looking your best at all times. These antioxidants have been proven do things like boost the immune system, slow down the aging process, make your bones stronger and even prevent cancer.

It can reduce stress.

While the physical cause behind this remains unknown, it’s a well-known fact that tea has been known to have calming effects on the body. Studies have even shown decreased heart rates in participants simply from smelling the aromas from lavender and jasmine variations. This can explain why it is so often used cross-culturally as a bonding tool, also reflecting why some cultures have tea so deeply ingrained as part of their customs. Tea has also been found to work as an anti-depressant, meaning brewing a cup the next time you’re feeling a little low might just help boost your mood.

It’s less likely to stain your clothes (and teeth).

At least, in comparison to coffee. Tea is a naturally lighter shade than the dark brew of coffee, so there’s a reduced risk of staining your button down on the way to the office. And as long as you’re not drinking gallons of tea a day (but let’s face it, I wouldn’t blame you), your teeth are safe from the unwarranted side effects of discoloration that occur after a cup of joe. Tea even contains fluoride, which actually protects your teeth.

The flavor options are endless.

Because tea can be made out of so many different materials, there’s a substantive range in flavors that just doesn’t exist in a simple coffee bean. You have the option to go more subtle, with floral undertones or opt for a bolder brew that’s full of herbs and spices: the variations are honestly endless. And if you’re missing that creamy quality, it’s easy to turn your favorite teas in tea lattes as well.

It’s easier to make and less expensive.

Coffee requires all the grinding, filtering, brewing, etc. Who has that kind of time? With tea, all you need is some hot water and you’re good to go. And because coffee requires this extra labor, it usually costs way more. Look at the menu at any restaurant or cafe and the coffee can be almost double the cost of a simple, yet delicious cup of tea.

It’s better for the environment.

As if we don’t already have enough personal reasons to choose tea over coffee, there’s also environmental benefits to it too. Producing coffee puts more of a strain on our Earth’s resources than tea. For large-scale coffee-roasting operation, harmful compounds are emitted into the atmosphere, whereas tea processing requires little more than the manual labor to pick the leaves. Tea also weighs much less than coffee, so it requires less fuel for transport and export around the world. So technically, tea also has a lower carbon footprint than coffee.

Let us know what other ways tea ultimately wins in the battle between leaves and beans.

Tea Guides

How Much Caffeine Are You Drinking in Your Tea?

March 28, 2016

Although we can estimate how much caffeine will be in your cup of tea, determining this amount never comes down to an exact science. Many factors play into how much of a kick you can get from your daily brew. Caffeine occurs naturally in tea, but the content varies based on growing variances, manufacturing, steeping times and brewing conditions. So whether you’re looking to give yourself a boost for that late night study session or sip on a soothing blend before bed, check out our definitive ranking of tea based on caffeine level to know just how much you’re drinking:

Herbal Tea (0mg)

If you want to relax with a toasty cup before bed, then herbal tea is definitely the way to go. Herbal teas are a great way to enjoy the benefits from tea’s antioxidants while avoiding the jittery feelings that often accompany caffeine intake. Herbal varieties are typically all-natural, made from various plant materials including the leaves, stems, roots and flowers from plants other than the Camellia Sinensis. Another benefit? Herbal teas don’t pose the risk of having addictive qualities, as is typically common with caffeinated beverages. However, if you’re still craving a little caffeine throughout the day, try substituting one cup a day with an herbal blend.

Decaf Tea (2-6mg)

Now you’re probably wondering,”how and why is there any caffeine in decaffeinated tea anyways?” Well, it’s important to note that decaffeinated does not mean the same thing as caffeine-free. Decaffeinated tea typically refers to black or green tea that has had most of its natural caffeine removed through processes that involve either the soaking or filtration of the leaves. But rest assured, the amount is almost negligible – by law, decaf tea must have less than 2.5% of its original caffeine level. So go ahead and brew another cup, it won’t keep you up at night.

White Tea (10-15mg)

White teas are the least processed of all teas, releasing minimal amounts of caffeine from their leaves while giving off a very subtle and silky taste. Though typically lower in caffeine content than its more processed counterparts, there can still be a wide range. However, white teas are usually blended with different herbs which bring down the caffeine level. White tea is a good option at anytime of the day, boasting little to no negative side effects.

Green Tea (20-35mg)

Green tea works as a great midday pick-me-up. Its moderately low caffeine level produces a very steady effect when consumed, causing no peaks or plunges. It is also considered an effective meditative aid, acting as a mild stimulant without causing any insomnia or jitters. The benefits of green tea are also numerous, so if you want to drink two or three servings a day, I’m not stopping you…

Oolong Tea (30-50mg)

Oolong tea is halfway between green and black teas, both in caffeine and oxidation levels. It has the body and complexity of a black tea while still maintaining the brightness of a green tea, making it a favorite among tea connoisseurs. Its caffeine content is both healthy and palatable, so it can provide a nice boost without the risk of crashing later in the day.

Black Tea (40-60mg)

Black tea is the strongest and most caffeinated of all the tea varieties. It acts as the perfect way to awaken your senses and kickstart your day. Chai tea is on the lower end of the caffeine spectrum while more processed blends can release higher levels. If you’re worried about too much caffeine, don’t stress; black tea still pales in comparison to the ridiculous caffeine content in coffee (just another reason why tea will always prevail).