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Tea Health Benefits

Black Tea May Fight Flu

September 7, 2017

As the fall approaches, so does flu season. But this year, you may have an extra defense against the flu: black tea.

Black Tea

Black Tea | A Girl With Tea at Flickr CC BY 2.0

According to researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, the flavonoids in black tea (and red wine and blueberries) may work with a microbe in your intestines to better fight the flu and other infections.

Vocab refresher: a flavonoid is a group of plant-derived compounds that are also antioxidants. Tea has many.

The researchers at Washington University found that certain microbes in the gut can work with flavonoids to unleash a strong immune response to the flu—in mice at least.

“We were able to identify at least one type of bacteria that uses [flavonoids] to boost interferon, a signaling molecule that aids the immune response,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Thaddeus Stappenbeck, a Conan Professor of Pathology & Immunology. “This prevented influenza-related lung damage in the mice,” he added, which can result in life-threatening complications like pneumonia.

While the researchers focused on mice, they did find a gut microbe in humans that they think will help people in the same way that it helps mice:

The microbe, Clostridium orbiscindens, interacts with flavonoids to create a metabolite that signals the immune system to beef things up. The metabolite is called desaminotyrosine, aka DAT.
The researchers found that mice who had both DAT and the flu experienced much less lung damage than mice with the flu who did not have DAT.

As the researchers put it, “Without DAT, influenza virus causes inflammation and severe disease.”

Conclusion: DAT helps fight the flu. And since humans can get DAT from things like black tea, they can experience the same flu-fighting properties as mice.

While the flavonoids in black tea are not going to prevent the flu, they can help your immune system fight off a serious complication. So this fall, in addition to getting a flu shot, stock your pantry with black tea!

 

Tea Health Benefits

Why You Should Start Drinking Tea Now

May 22, 2017

The ceremony of tea evokes a grey-haired British grandmother with Victorian fine silver teapots; porcelain cups hand-painted with violets; Emily Post place settings on rustic William and Mary style antique chestnut dining tables; doilies on every available surface; dusty heirlooms and curio cabinets – you get the picture. And, certainly, the British have owned the domain of tea—originally discovered by China—since the 1600s and the advent of the East India Company.

And yet tea is not just for elderly grandmothers or the British. The beverage appeals to all generations and cultures. What’s more, the beverage provides certain health benefits as we age. These can only be fully taken advantage of by creating your tea drinking habit sooner rather than later. Here’s our guide to getting the most from your tea. The fountain of youth may very well be flowing with tea.

Detoxification

In the article, “Anti-Aging Research Brief” published by the Academy of Anti-Aging, tea is brimming with antioxidant polyphenols called catechins, flavonols, theaflavins and thearubigins. Antioxidants ultimately help prevent cancerous cells from forming, repair damage to cells and to protect blood vessel walls from free radicals. The article cites a study from King’s College in London that compared a group of black tea drinkers with a group of coffee drinkers. Scientists studied the health of both groups after one year, and found “that the tea drinkers’ risk of a heart attack approached half of the non-tea drinkers.” The scientists speculated “that tea’s beneficial cardio effects are due to the beverage’s large amounts of flavonoids.”

So what teas contain the highest levels of antioxidants? Many brands you can purchase at large chain grocery stores contain high levels of antioxidants, including Celestial Seasonings Green Tea, with 217 milligrams (mg) of antioxidants, Lipton Green Tea (201 mg), Bigelow Darjeeling Blend (164 mg). Surprisingly, a few brands of popular teas have absolutely no antioxidant content, including Lipton Lemon Iced Tea and Snapple Peach Iced Tea.

Prevent Cancer

Studies have shown that caffeine and consuming two cups of coffee can “harden a person’s arteries for several hours afterwards. This puts extra pressure on the heart, thus increasing the risk of heart attack or stroke.” Further, “it is evident today that many of our cancers are related to a dominance of estrogen. In a world flooded with estrogen and estrogen-like compounds, it is important for our bodies to have as low of an estrogen load as possible.” So drinking more than two cups of coffee can increase estrogen and lead to breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men. Reducing caffeine is integral to cancer prevention, and replacing coffee with tea can easily half caffeine consumption and decrease the risk of cancer.

Blood Sugar Regulation

Teas, especially the variety of green tea known as matcha, can help regulate blood sugar. Matcha is actually powdered green tea leaves prepared with boiled water and a bamboo whisk, and is known to stabilize metabolism for those with hypo- or hyperglycemic maladies. Taking an active role in regulating blood sugar at a younger age can help prevent complications down the road.

Weight Loss

An ingredient in matcha tea, EGCG, boosts metabolism. While matcha has a high level of caffeine and may contribute to higher estrogen levels, which will help you burn fat and lose weight.

Tea Guides

Brew Buds: Beer & Tea

March 23, 2017

Like the tea industry, the beer market is enjoying a period of extreme creativity.  Like tea drinkers, beer drinkers now expect a wide array of flavors that reflect a mixture of ethnic backgrounds, flavor profiles, and aromas. Both tea and craft beer consumption have been on the rise in recent years, so it only makes sense that brewers would put them together with inventive tea-beer hybrids.  Here are a few beers infused with tea that we think are worth toasting:

1) Yogi Beer

Yogi Beer Glasses

This beer from Texas-based Rogness Brewing Company counts black tea among its ingredients, joining cinnamon, clove, ginger, cardamom, and black pepper to create an exotic, spicy, and bitter mix of flavors. The 5.2% ABV (Alcohol By Volume) beer comes in 22-ounce bottles or can be served on draught. Rogness suggests pairing this beer with “bold” Asian dishes such as curry and tandoori chicken. This Indian-inspired beverage also boasts notes of caramel, and judging by the name, we think it’s a great post-yoga treat.

2) Chamomile Wheat Beer

Beaver Brewing Company Logo

This beer from Beaver Brewing Company blends the calming power and lovely scent of chamomile flowers with cracked and torrified wheat, malt, fuggle, and hallertau hops to create a distinctive beer with 4.2% ABV. Made in a nanobrewery in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, each beer is crafted by hand in a 1.5 barrel system. You can try out this herbal tea-infused beer onsite at the brewery’s restaurant/brewpub in Pennsylvania, or email dan@beaverbrewingcompany.com to order your own batch of the artisan beverage.

3) Sah’tea

Dogfish Sah'tea

This beer from Dogfish puts a tea spin on a classic 9th century Finnish beer known as sahti, combining black tea and juniper berries for a modern take on a beverage that Vikings enjoyed centuries ago.   Dogfish promises, “The spicing is subtle and balanced, and Sah’tea is a highly-quaffable, truly unique brew with a full mouthfeel.” The New Yorker’s Burkhard Bilger wrote about Dogfish’s Sah’tea in his article “A Better Brew: The Rise of Extreme Beer,” describing Sah’tea as follows:

“…The tea and spices in it hovered politely in the background, leaving the yeast to run the show. Cloudy and golden, with a lush flowering of bananas and cloves, it tasted like something a trader might have sipped a century ago, standing in a colonial market in Ceylon, with open baskets of tea and spices all around. It wasn’t an extreme beer by any stretch, and it certainly didn’t taste Finnish. But it was a time capsule nonetheless.”

Try it for yourself and see if you agree!

4) Kombucha Beer

Kombucha Beer

On-trend kombucha gets in on over-21 fun with this collection of kombucha-based Triple Goodness beers from United Vibration. Organic, gluten-free, and vegan, each beer is raw and contains 30-day brewed Kombucha. Flavors include: Raspberry, Ginger, Bourbon Peach, and K.P.A (Kombucha Pale Ale).

5) Par-Tea Pale Ale

Par-Tea Pale Ale Prism Brewing Company

Prism Beer Company wanted to create a pale ale that was “approachable” and “not to bitter,” and turned to whole leaf Orange Peko tea to achieve the combination. With a modest 5.5% ABV, this Par-Tea Pale Ale is a flavorful alternative to a standard pale ale. Prism recommends combining this beer with lemonade for an extra sweet refreshment.

Topics

Tea Trends for 2017

January 3, 2017

This year, tea’s not just here to stay—it’s poised to rise. According to MarketWatch, the global tea market will grow by 6.88 billion from 14.45 billion at the end of 2016 to 21.33 billion in 2024. Louise Pollock, the President of food, health, and wellness PR firm Pollock Communications, told Beverage Daily, “The beverage category has grown exponentially and tea is set to experience a lot of growth moving into 2017 and 2018.” But what exactly can we expect from the tea industry this year? We noticed a few prominent trends you can look forward to this year:

1) Green Tea

green-tea

After surveying 1700 registered dieticians, Pollock Communications named green tea one of the Top Ten Superfoods of 2017. As busy Americans look for beverages on the go that are both convenient and healthy, look out for more bottled green teas. In addition to green teas, Pollock Communications expects teas made with whole leaves and natural ingredients to rise, thanks to our increasingly health-conscious population.

2) Matcha 

matcha-tea-cake

According to Datassential, matcha grew by 50% in the US from 2010 to 2015, and multiple sources say it will continue to rise in availability and popularity in the coming years. In 2015, just 1% of non-alcoholic beverage menus included matcha, so it’s still in its early stage of consumer awareness and demand, but get ready to watch that number climb. Matcha most commonly appears on menus as a tea or in blended beverages, but it’s also a great ingredient in baking, as we illustrated with White Chocolate Matcha Brownies. So look out for this green powder on dessert menus or in the grocery aisle to make your own tea-infused baked goods.

3) Tea on Tap

tap

Restaurants want to make it easy to deliver you a new, exciting product. FoodBytes says, “Suddenly everything is on tap—wine, cocktails, nitro and cold brew coffee, kombucha, on-tred spirits like amaro.” That’s right: this year we predict you’ll see kombucha and other teas on tap with greater frequency. It’s part of a larger trend you’ll see in 2017: packaging and formatting that makes tea even easier to grab in a restaurant or on the go. From eateries that have self-serving taps at your table to coffee shops, movie theaters, and supermarkets offering exotic bottled teas, 2017 will see more grab ‘n sip options than ever before.

4) More, More, More

tea ingredient collection

Tea trends from the last several years will drive the growth of tea consumption at home, at restaurants, and on the go in 2017. We’ll continue to see teas blending herbs and spices to deliver exotic and flavorful beverages, lesser-known leaves like oolong and rooibos sharing shelf space with black and green teas, tea dishes incorporating on-trend flavors like cateja, tea-infused cocktails, coffee-inspired teas (i.e. a green tea latte or mocha), ingredients like berries and fruit replacing milk and sugar as co-stars in every cup, and the strong performance of iced tea—85% of tea consumption in the USA is iced, per the Tea Association of the United States. These trends are far from over, and we’ll continue to see them grow this year. 

Whatever way you pour it, the teacup is looking half full for 2017!

 

 

Tea Recipes

Tea Mocktails for a Sober New Year’s Eve

December 13, 2016

You don’t need alcohol to have a fun, delicious New Year’s Eve. Whether you’re hosting a sober event or hosting a party where the alcohol’s flowing, it’s important to offer non-alcoholic drinks so that all your guests are comfortable. Creating a signature mocktail is one way to add intrigue to your affair and make it a night to remember for both booze lovers and avoiders.  Here are 5 tea-based mocktails that will knock your socks off and make this New Year’s Eve a hit.

1) Peach Sweet Tea Mocktail

peach-tea-mocktail

This mocktail from The Chew is a sweet treat that’s perfect for any party. Start by making a black tea simple syrup: Simply heat sugar and water in a saucepan, then add 2 black tea bags. Next, fire up your blender and blend frozen peaches, peach jam, and almond. Set aside while you decorate your glass rims with a combination of crushed almond, lemon, and sugar.  Then pour your simple syrup and blended concoction in the glasses, topping off with soda water.  Peachy keen!

2) Hot Tea and Booze Free Toddy

hot-tea-toddy

3) Green Tea Apple Mocktail

apple-tea-mocktail

This recipe from Delicious must be made one day in advance, so plan ahead. Start by brewing green tea. Combine with apple juice and then chill overnight. The next day, add red and green apple slices, mint springs, and sparkling mineral water. Serve over crushed ice and you have a beautiful, fruity mix sure to go down easy.

4) Frosty Coconut Mint Green Tea Mocktail

frosty-coconut-green-tea

This gorgeous mocktail from Strength and Sunshine combines the tasty prowess and trend power of green tea and coconut water. Start by putting two mint leaves and a green tea bag in a bottle of coconut water.  Chill the bottle for one hour. Then pour into a blender, add two more mint leaves and ice cubes, and blend away. Stop once the consistency is nice and frosty. Pour into a glass, garnish as desired, and marvel at your green creation.

5) Lipton Tea and Honey Sparkling Sangria Mocktail

sangria-mocktail

A little Lipton goes a long way, as evidenced by this sangria mocktail from Flour on my Face. Pick up a packet of Lipton’s Tea & Honey Iced Green Tea Blackberry Pomegranate mix (try saying that five times fast). Combine with water in a pitcher. Add orange, lemon, and lime wedges, blackberries, and ice to the pitcher. Pour in sparkling grape juice. Then pour into glasses over ice and garnish with lime and mint.  Colorful, delicious, and fruity, this mocktail has all the trappings of an auspicious signature drink.

Tea Recipes

5 Classic Holiday Desserts With a Tea Twist

December 1, 2016

As the winter holidays approach, parties abound at work, home, and friends’ apartments, which means there are plenty of opportunities to bake. Partygoers are surely looking forward to classic desserts like apple pie and Sufganiyot, but why not delight their taste buds with a tea surprise? Here are 5 recipes that add tea to the classic holiday desserts you and your fellow party animals will relish:

1) Green Tea Gingerbread Cookies

green tea gingerbread cookies

Green tea gives these gingerbread cookies from Eat Green Tea a little something extra. Start by mixing green tea leaves and butter over heat for about ten minutes, then stir in add molasses and chocolate. Add flour, brown sugar, baking soda and powder, milk, salt, and ginger to create dough. Chill the dough, and then cut into gingerbread men (or women!) before popping in the oven. Decorate as you wish with icing, and enjoy!

2) Chai Sufganiyot with Orange-Pumpkin Buttercream

chai sufganiyot with orange-pumpkin buttercream

Hannukah Donuts enjoy notes of chai in this recipe from Chowhound.  One chai tea bag joins cinnamon, cardamom, salt, vegetable oil, milk, vanilla, eggs, butter, and flour to make the donuts themselves. A tasty orange-pumpkin buttercream  filling seals these donuts’ spot in innovative territory.

3) Green Tea Shortbread Cookies

green tea shortbread cookies

Green tea gives these shortbread cookies from Smitten Kitten a holiday makeover, and white chocolate filling offers a snowy accent. Mix unsweetened green tea powder with flour, salt, sugar, butter, and almond extract to create a yummy dough ready for your favorite holiday cookie cutters. The green dough is a perfect candidate for cookie trees, leaves, and wreaths, but who wouldn’t love a green snowman cookie?

4) Black Tea Apple Pie

black tea apple pie

This recipe from Sift and Whisk adds black tea to classic apple pie. Pour black tea over apple slices and then let them dry before baking them into the pie. According to the author, “The tea flavor in this pie is very light and only peeks out every few bites or so.” That means it’s a great candidate for an audience expecting a classic but is open to a little adventure.

5) Chocolate Matcha Babka chocolate matcha babka

Babka typically enjoys extras like walnuts or raisins, but for maximum holiday cheer, follow this recipe from Aloha Belly and add chocolate and matcha to the sweet yeast treat. This recipe requires you to plan ahead, as the dough must rise overnight. Plus, working with yeast is not especially easy. But if you’re feeling more ambitious than buying a store-bought mix, roll up your sleeves and attempt this tea-infused babka.

Tea Guides

5 Delicious Tea-Food Pairings

November 24, 2016
tea sommeliers testing tea

Tea sommeliers are on the rise as consumers expect more from their dining experience | Sebastiaan ter Burg from Flickr via Creative Commons 2.0 | LINK

We’ve become savvier consumers. We want to know where our ingredients come from, we’re open to trying new ethnic flavors, and basic just doesn’t cut it anymore. We don’t want just any old tea to go with our dish. We want a tea that complements the dish, or vice versa. This demand has sparked the new job of tea sommelier. According to NPR, a tea sommelier is “the hot new thing in tea pairing.” Just like a wine sommelier would recommend a specific wine to accompany your meal, a tea sommelier knows just the right tea to go with your grub. Tea expert Aurelie Bessiere told NPR, “What you want to happen in your mouth is to feel the different layers of taste and flavors of both tea and food.” If you don’t have a tea sommelier on speed dial or the time to take a tea pairing class, here’s five food-tea pairing recommendations to kickstart your knowledge of this new art:

1) Kabuse Green Tea & Chocolate

According to NPR, “The kabuse is a green tea with high levels of umami—a pleasant, savory taste—as well as sweet and salty. The article says that “when these three flavors hit melted chocolate, you unlock a flavor similar to pure cantaloupe.”  Strange, but color us curious.  Kubuse and chocolate, please!

2) Butterfly of Taiwan Oolong & Sheep Cheese

NPR also recommends this pairing because the cheese enhances the fruity (think apple puree and candied citrus) and honey notes of the tea, which seems sweeter. The strong woody notes of the tea are elevated to a lighter and greener tone.”  That description exemplifies what makes tea pairing so special: when done right, it has the ability to elevate and enhance the flavors in both the food and the tea.

3) Earl Grey & Orange Beef and Chinese Broccoli

Bigelow recommends pairing its Earl Grey tea with red meat, duck, or dark chocolate, arguing that the tea’s citrus notes make them a perfect match with these meats and sweets. Bigelow’s recipe for Orange Beef and Chinese Broccoli meets that criteria, with an added bonus of more tea: it uses Bigelow’s Orange & Spice Herbal tea in the stir fry.  Double the dose of tea?  Sign us up.

4) Pu-erh & Mushrooms

Pu-erh, a fermented tea grown in China’s southwest Yunnan Province, goes well with mushrooms, tea sommelier Melani Franks told Fresh Cup Magazine. Pu-erh smells like soil, complementing the earthy tone of mushrooms. Try creating a pu-erh broth and adding mushrooms, or marinating mushrooms in a pu-erh-based concoction.

5) Black Tea & Camembert

Wine and cheese may seem like an unbreakable duo, but pairing tea and cheese works very well, too. Food & Wine recommends pairing black tea and camembert. Heidi Johannssen Stewart of Bellocq Tea Atelier recommends her company’s Gypsy Caravan tea—which blends black tea with rose and chile– to go along with Camembert. She told Food & Wine that this pairing “feels like you’re sitting around the fireplace.” Elaborates Food & Wine, the Gypsy Caravan black tea “features a gentle, smoky finish, which is excellent with Camembert earthy flavor.”

Don’t have the ingredients for these specific pairings?

Here’s a handy dandy chart from the Tea Association of Canada to get your noggin working on some other ideas. With so many varieties of tea on the market, each offering a unique flavor profile, we’re sure you’ll come up with some genius pairings on your own:

tea and food pairing

Tea Recipes

5 Recipes That Infuse Tea With Marinade

November 3, 2016

When you’ve got a little extra time on your hands, or you’re just really good at planning in advance, marinating meat is a wonderful way to make sure your dinner’s bursting with flavor. Using tea in a marinade is a simple way to achieve maximum flavor and a unique profile. Here are five recipes that incorporate tea in their marinades to yield tasty results:

1) Black Tea & Soy Marinated Tofu

Tea Marinade Tofu

Tofu is a model base to cook with because it takes on any flavor you work with. Why not infuse this protein-rich base with your favorite kind of tea? This recipe calls for black tea, flavoring the classic with soy sauce, ginger, and garlic cloves to create a marinade for your tofu to sit in for at least an hour, and ideally overnight. Once the tofu’s soaked up this tea marinade, pop it in the oven. 25 to 30 minutes later, you have a healthy, flavorful treat.

2) Jasmine Tea-Marinated Salmon

Tea Marinade Salmon

Start by boiling jasmine tea to follow this delicious salmon recipe. Add chipotle pepper, vinegar, salt, and ice cubes to the tea in a blender, then pour over salmon and marinate in the refrigerator for 30 to 45 minutes. Before grilling, season your fish with chili powder and jasmine tea leaves. Once it’s off the grill, add some chives and honey for a final garnish, and you’ve got one impressive meal to serve.

3) Green Tea Mustard Marinade

green-tea-mustard

This recipe uses mustard, traditionally a condiment, and tea, usually a beverage, as atypical bases in this marinade that’s great on steak. Begin with green tea and whisk in both stone ground mustard and Dijon, as well as oregano, marjoram, and olive oil. Add your meat, and marinate for up to 24 hours for a unique dish that’s sure to dazzle carnivores.

4) Lemon Pepper Iced Tea Chicken

iced-tea-marinade

Iced tea becomes an ingredient in this chicken dish that’s perfect for your summertime barbecue. Kick your marinade off with unsweetened iced tea and add lemon juice, garlic cloves, honey, olive oil, salt, black pepper, and rosemary. Add your chicken and marinate for eight hours until throwing it on the grill and making your guests very happy.

5) Sweet Tea-Marinated Pork Chop Sandwich

sweet-tea-pork-mardinade

This recipe marinates pork chops in sweet tea for at least six hours before using it as the base of a delectable sandwich. After spending some quality time in the refrigerator, the tea-soaked meat is dipped in milk and then fried in flour, pepper, salt, and garlic. Once cooked, it’s topped with veggies and lovingly sandwiched between two buns.

Tea Recipes

Black Tea Oatmeal to Jumpstart Your Day

June 16, 2016

It’s time to combine two of the best things about the morning: tea with breakfast. Now you can enjoy the most important meal of the day even more!

Recipe:

You can adapt this recipe to work with any hot breakfast cereal. In this case we’ve kept it simple, and stuck by a quick oat method. If you decide to adapt it, simply keep in mind for every cup of milk, you will want a teaspoon of tea. You can also easily substitute the dairy for water, or any vegan dairy alternative of your choice.

Ingredients:

● 1 teaspoon Earl Grey, Earl Grey Lavender, or Earl Grey Creme black teas. If you prefer, any black tea will suffice.

● 8 ounces of milk

● ½ cup quick oats

● Pinch of salt

● Tasty garnishes – sliced almonds, banana, chia seeds, segmented oranges, cherries, walnuts (the sky’s the limit!)

Directions:

Bring the milk to a boil – be careful not to scorch it. Place the tea in with an infuser or disposable tea bag, and let steep 5 minutes. Alternatively, submerge the tea leaves fully. Remove the tea infuser or strain the tea leaves off.

Add a pinch of salt to the milk. Bring back up to a boil. Add the quick oats and bring the temperature down to a simmer and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and cover. Let stand for 2 to 3 minutes.

Garnish with your favorite munchies and enjoy!

Be sure to take a snapshot of your bowl and share it with us on Instagram or Twitter and let us know what you think of the recipe in the comments below.

Tea Guides

How Much Caffeine Are You Drinking in Your Tea?

March 28, 2016

Although we can estimate how much caffeine will be in your cup of tea, determining this amount never comes down to an exact science. Many factors play into how much of a kick you can get from your daily brew. Caffeine occurs naturally in tea, but the content varies based on growing variances, manufacturing, steeping times and brewing conditions. So whether you’re looking to give yourself a boost for that late night study session or sip on a soothing blend before bed, check out our definitive ranking of tea based on caffeine level to know just how much you’re drinking:

Herbal Tea (0mg)

If you want to relax with a toasty cup before bed, then herbal tea is definitely the way to go. Herbal teas are a great way to enjoy the benefits from tea’s antioxidants while avoiding the jittery feelings that often accompany caffeine intake. Herbal varieties are typically all-natural, made from various plant materials including the leaves, stems, roots and flowers from plants other than the Camellia Sinensis. Another benefit? Herbal teas don’t pose the risk of having addictive qualities, as is typically common with caffeinated beverages. However, if you’re still craving a little caffeine throughout the day, try substituting one cup a day with an herbal blend.

Decaf Tea (2-6mg)

Now you’re probably wondering,”how and why is there any caffeine in decaffeinated tea anyways?” Well, it’s important to note that decaffeinated does not mean the same thing as caffeine-free. Decaffeinated tea typically refers to black or green tea that has had most of its natural caffeine removed through processes that involve either the soaking or filtration of the leaves. But rest assured, the amount is almost negligible – by law, decaf tea must have less than 2.5% of its original caffeine level. So go ahead and brew another cup, it won’t keep you up at night.

White Tea (10-15mg)

White teas are the least processed of all teas, releasing minimal amounts of caffeine from their leaves while giving off a very subtle and silky taste. Though typically lower in caffeine content than its more processed counterparts, there can still be a wide range. However, white teas are usually blended with different herbs which bring down the caffeine level. White tea is a good option at anytime of the day, boasting little to no negative side effects.

teabag-550397_1280

Green Tea (20-35mg)

Green tea works as a great midday pick-me-up. Its moderately low caffeine level produces a very steady effect when consumed, causing no peaks or plunges. It is also considered an effective meditative aid, acting as a mild stimulant without causing any insomnia or jitters. The benefits of green tea are also numerous, so if you want to drink two or three servings a day, I’m not stopping you…

Oolong Tea (30-50mg)

Oolong tea is halfway between green and black teas, both in caffeine and oxidation levels. It has the body and complexity of a black tea while still maintaining the brightness of a green tea, making it a favorite among tea connoisseurs. Its caffeine content is both healthy and palatable, so it can provide a nice boost without the risk of crashing later in the day.

Black Tea (40-60mg)

Black tea is the strongest and most caffeinated of all the tea varieties. It acts as the perfect way to awaken your senses and kickstart your day. Chai tea is on the lower end of the caffeine spectrum while more processed blends can release higher levels. If you’re worried about too much caffeine, don’t stress; black tea still pales in comparison to the ridiculous caffeine content in coffee (just another reason why tea will always prevail).